Daylight Savings Time in The USA

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DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME 2014

DST BEGINS in 2014 on Sunday 9th March at 02.00 am local (becoming 03.00 am local) when the clocks go FORWARD 1 hour to adjust for summer time.

DST ENDS in 2014 on Sunday 2nd November at 02.00 am local (becoming 01.00 am local) when the clocks go BACK 1 hour to go back onto standard time.

Past & Future Changes

Daylight Savings Time 2013
DST BEGINS in 2013 on Sunday 10th March at 02.00 am local (becoming 03.00 am local) when the clocks go FORWARD 1 hour to adjust for summer time.

DST ENDS in 2013 on Sunday 3rd November at 02.00 am local (becoming 01.00 am local) when the clocks go BACK 1 hour to go back onto standard time.

Daylight Savings Time 2014
DST BEGINS in 2014 on Sunday 9th March at 02.00 am local (becoming 03.00 am local) when the clocks go FORWARD 1 hour to adjust for summer time.

DST ENDS in 2014 on Sunday 2nd November at 02.00 am local (becoming 01.00 am local) when the clocks go BACK 1 hour to go back onto standard time.

Daylight Savings Time 2015
DST BEGINS in 2015 on Sunday 8th March at 02.00 am local (becoming 03.00 am local) when the clocks go FORWARD 1 hour to adjust for summer time.

DST ENDS in 2015 on Sunday 1st November at 02.00 am local (becoming 01.00 am local) when the clocks go BACK 1 hour to go back onto standard time.

Daylight Savings Time 2016
DST BEGINS in 2016 on Sunday 13th March at 02.00 am local (becoming 03.00 am local) when the clocks go FORWARD 1 hour to adjust for summer time.

DST ENDS in 2016 on Sunday 6th November at 02.00 am local (becoming 01.00 am local) when the clocks go BACK 1 hour to go back onto standard time.

When Did The USA Adopt DST?

DST was not established in the USA until 1918, when the US, like those in Europe, adopted it to enable them to save energy and work longer hours in the daylight. However, it was still a bit of a contentious issue once World War I had ended and thus it was only used for seven months before congress then repelled the idea of it again in 1919.

As a result of congress’ decision DST became an option within states and cities and only a few states including Rhode Island and Massachusetts, plus cities including New York, Chicago and Philadelphia carried on using it beyond 1919.

DST was not imposed on US society again until 1942, when the then President (Franklin Roosevelt) imposed a year round change, known then as “Summer Time” until 30th September 1945.

Beyond 1945 there was still no law passed governing DST and states were again free to choose whether to observe DST or not.

Confusion in the US

With individual states allowed to choose whether to observe DST or not this understandably caused a lot of confusion, especially amongst travel companies such as bus and railway, and broadcasting companies such as TV and radio. All of these different industries had to publish differing schedules dependent on where people lived and whether their state was observing DST or not.

The Uniform Act was passed by congress in 1966 meaning that all states were to observe DST and those who did not want to would have to pass an individual state law.

It has been an inconsistent pass for the USA when it comes to DST and even in 1973 President Nixon passed the law known as the Emergency Daylight Saving Time Energy Conservation Act of 1973, again trying to observe a year-round “Summer Time”. Beginning on the 6th January 1974 the Daylight Saving Time Energy Act was implemented and the clocks immediately went forward one hour, nationwide. On 5th October 1974 Congress were forced to amend the act and the US returned to standard time on the 27th October 1974. DST then resumed the following February of 75 and ended in October of 75.

Now, all states in the US observe DST, along with parts of Canada and Mexico. Some states are still opposed to the idea, especially in Alaska where its most Northern parts experience extremely long days in the Summer.

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